Wooden Hill Brewing Company, the first craft brewery in Edina, MN, is now open! Visit us today to try one of our unique craft brews, from our V Stitches Session IPA to our Chocolate Crow Wheat Stout. And don’t forget to pair your brew with a gourmet dog, flatbread pizza or roasted sandwich from our kitchen. Like us on Facebook to stay up to date on our planned Grand Opening party, happening later this spring! See more about us online:

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The mayor and City Council of Edina, Minnesota, have publicly apologized for a videotaped altercation between a white police officer and a black man that circulated heavily on social media, after hearing emotional testimony from the audience about race relations there.

Speakers of different races testified Tuesday one-by-one before the council about the quality of race relations in Edina, a wealthy Minneapolis suburb that is 15 minutes south of the city, and has a population that is 88 percent white and 3 percent black, according to Census figures.

The scheduled council meeting set aside its regular agenda in order to address the audience’s frustrations, according to ABC St. Paul affiliate KSTP-TV.

A white woman testified that Edina needed to "confess its sins."

"As Lutherans, the very first thing we do in services is confess our sins," she said, her voice shaking with emotion.

"The DNA in my body said that that man is next," suggesting that Larnie Thomas, the man in the video, could have been shot by police were it not for someone’s filming the interaction.

A black man testified Tuesday about how he travels to Edina to go shopping, and feels conscious of his clothing and appearance when he is there.

An Indian man told the council Tuesday that racism "is a problem" in the city. Another man said Thomas was "treated like an animal."

This image from a video that was posted on YouTube, shows a man, Larnie Thomas, being held at the arm by an Edina police officer, who refuses to let go of him.

The video from last Wednesday showed Thomas’ being held back by his jacket by a plainclothes police officer who refused Thomas’ demands that he be released. In it, the officer told Thomas that he was walking in the middle of the street.

Thomas responded that he was avoiding sidewalk construction. Throughout the video, Thomas’ frustration was apparent, and at one point Janet Rowle, a bystander who filmed the altercation, told the officer that Thomas was "scared."

Thomas removed his jacket, then his shirt to escape the officer’s grasp. A second officer arrived and arrested Thomas.

The disturbing the peace charge against him has been dropped.

The Minnesota NAACP told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that it is still awaiting a formal written apology, beyond the city’s response that it is investigating the arrest and the verbal regrets officials expressed at Tuesday’s meeting.

Councilmember Bob Stewart said, “I think we can do better.”

He said he would contact Thomas to try to make sure an incident like this didn’t happen again.

“For Mr. Larnie Thomas, I’m going to meet him face-to-face,” Edina Mayor James Hovland said at Tuesday’s hearing. “It’s one thing for me to sit up here and apologize, it’s another to meet him face-to-face.”

As for the charges against Thomas being dropped, the Minnesota NAACP wrote on its Facebook page that "this is not justice, but it is a step in the right direction."

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Delores Helen Bentdahl

Delores Helen (Seppman) Bentdahl went home to be with her Lord on April 5, 2018.

A celebration of her life will be held Saturday April 14, 2018 at 11am at Christ Presbyterian Church, 6901 Normandale Road in Edina with Pastor Rich Phenow presiding. Visitation will be at 10am. All are invited to a luncheon immediately following the service. A ceremony of Christian burial will follow the luncheon at Lake Hanska Cemetery where she will be buried next to her beloved husband of 35 years, Orlando Bentdahl. Pastor Sara Taylor of Lake Hanska Lutheran Church will preside at the graveside.

She is survived by her six children; Marlow Bentdahl, Deanna (Pat) Mohr, Debra (Otto/Scotty)Koch, Sherraye (David) Lindstrom, Bonnie (Tom) Gasper, and Lizabeth (Tim) Stahl; 14 grand children; Bryan and Brandon Bentdahl, Tahnae(Bentdahl) Brickner, Jennifer Rindt, Kristine Hardy, Jared, Aaron, Michael, and Carrie Mohr, Rachel, Joseph and Rebecca Gasper, Jordan and Alyx Stahl; Great-grandchildren; Carlila and Caeli Schlumpberger, Elliott (Leo)Mohr, Katherine and Jonah Rindt, Grace, Malana, and Jeremy Hardy, brother-in-law James (Gloria) Matteson, and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband Orlando Bentdahl, parents; William and Emma (Schaub) Seppman, siblings; Darlene Matteson, Florian Seppman, Dorothy Paulsen, grandson; Adam Bentdahl; daughter-in-law Susan Bentdahl, and son-in-law Otto (Scotty) Koch.

Delores was born April 4, 1932, at Immanuel Lutheran Hospital in Mankato, MN. She graduated from Mankato Senior High School and was active in Quill and Scroll, German Club, Art Club, the Yell Club, art and journalism. As staff artist for the Mankato High Newspaper, she designed and cut linoleum blocks and created event covers. She honed many of her skills in block printing, water color, oil and acrylic painting as a charter member of the Minneopa Trail Blazers 4H Club. She won the first purple ribbon ever awarded at the 1949 MN State Fair for an oil painting of her family farm. In later years, she worked with clay and jewelry, making wall plaques and hand-crafted dishes. Delores was baptized, confirmed and married at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Mankato, MN. Following her marriage to Orlando, she resided on a farm in rural Hanska for 65 years. In October of 2015, she moved to Summerhouse in Bloomington, MN. Delores enjoyed being a full-time homemaker and active member of Lake Hanska Lutheran Church where she taught Sunday School, made quilts, attended Bible studies, and served with Ladies Aid for funerals, weddings and Hi-League events. Delores also shared her artistic gifts on the altar committee. She served on the Luther Memorial Board and enjoyed attending the New Ulm Christian Women’s Club. She and Orlando were active in the Minnesota Turkey Producers, the Minnesota Pork Producers, the Brown County Farm Bureau and R.E.A. Her Hanska farm is registered as a Century Farm having been in the Bentdahl family since 1890. Traveling with her husband, family, and tour groups was a life-long passion. She visited Canada, Juarez Mexico, and 47 states. Delores won many ribbons at the Brown County Fair in painting, clay jewelry, and wall décor. Above all, she loved spending time with her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren taking pictures of everything and sharing them with everyone. Her family will miss her red lipstick-kisses, which were a mark of her love for all of them. May her memory and legacy be blessed. In lieu of flowers, memorials in her honor to Grace Hospice and N.C. Little Memorial Hospice are appreciated.

A visitation will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on 2018 -04-14 at Christ Prebyterian Church, 6901 Normandale Road, Edina, MN, USA. A funeral service will be held from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on 2018-04-14 at Christ Presbyterian Church, 6901 Normandale Road, Edina, MN, USA.

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EDINA, Minn. — Former Forest City, Iowa, resident Mary Ames, 85, of Edina, MN, died on Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, at St. Therese of New Hope, MN, from complications of a stroke.

Mary was born on Oct. 28, 1930, in Nevada, IA, the daughter of Hollie and Irene (McCauley) Shaffer. She graduated from Swaledale High School and then attended what is now the University of Northern Iowa and North Iowa Area Community College. For a few years, Mary taught in primary schools in northern Iowa.

In the mid-1950s, she moved to Forest City. During the Forest City years, she worked for the family furniture store, the local high school and refugee settlement programs. Mostly, she was a strong and loving mother to her children and an optimistic and energetic presence in the lives of her many friends.

In the mid-1980s, Mary moved to the Twin Cities, where she was a long-time parishioner at St. Richard’s Catholic Church in Richfield. She worked for Medica for many years, retiring in 2008 at the age of 77.

While at Medica, Mary became known as the “bunny lady.” She cajoled and encouraged her colleagues to donate a toy bunny to be distributed to needy children during Easter time. She felt all kids needed a bunny to hug, even if their family couldn’t provide one. For her efforts, she was featured on local TV news. The annual “bunny drive” is an ongoing effort at Medica and other local companies.

But it was Habitat for Humanity that fully activated Mary’s volunteerism gene. Through St. Richard’s parish, she raised money and organized several Habitat “builds” in the Twin Cities. She used her vacation time and money to build houses in Tennessee and Alabama (in the wake of Hurricane Katrina) and in Northern Ireland, Poland, Thailand and Botswana. In its 2006-07 Annual Report, the Twin Cities chapter recognized Mary’s devotion to the families sheltered by Habitat. “Every kid needs a kitchen table where they can do homework.”

Mary was proud of her Irish heritage. In 2005, she organized a family reunion in Dublin that attracted about 30 family members from eight U.S. states. A Mass was said for Mary at St. Andrew’s Church in Dublin City Center on Saturday.

Mary is survived by her son, Joe (Linda), of Irvine, CA; daughters Jean of New Hope, MN and Anne (Tom) of Minneapolis; grandchildren Tony (Sharayah), Callie, Mitchell, Shannon, Jack, Paul; great-grandson Carter and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

Visitation will be on Monday, Oct. 24, from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Gill Brothers Funeral Home, 5801 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis. After the visitation, the family invites Mary’s friends to toast “a life well lived” at Houlihan’s, 6601 Lyndale Ave. S.

On Tuesday, Oct. 25, St. Richard’s Catholic Church, 7540 Penn Avenue S. in Richfield, will be open at 9:30 a.m. for visitation. The funeral Mass will begin at 10:30 a.m. with lunch to follow. Burial will be Tuesday, 4 p.m., at Elmwood-St. Joseph’s Cemetery, 1224 S. Washington Ave., Mason City, IA.

Buy Now Ames

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Edina City Council members took up the issue of amending the comprehensive plan which, would allow for a significant increase in the height of buildings.

The vote Tuesday specifically addressed property at the corner of France Avenue and 69th Street West, which currently accommodates two low-level bank buildings.

Ryan Companies has proposed developing that corner into high density, high rise residential housing with a park plaza, green space, retail, 82 owner-occupied condominiums and 6 brownstone style townhomes.

Courtesy Ryan Companies

But before dirt can be moved, council members have to vote to rezone the land to allow the building to be much taller.

"This would allow building height to go from four stories to 20-plus stories," said Cory Teague, development director for Edina.

The proposed project is called the Estelle Towers and would include luxurious, low-maintenance living.

Dawnn Eldredge, who lives nearby at Lake Cornelia, said the project appeals to her.

"This would breathe new life into the Southdale area," she said.

One of the towers would be 24 stories, the other would be 22 stories. That means the contentious skyscrapers would surpass the height of other buildings in the area.

Neighbor Kari Geadelmann, who is a neighbor to the project location, said she appreciates the design, but does not approve of the location.

"I don’t think anybody wants to look at that 24 hours a day, 7 days a week," she said.

Geadelmann was also concerned residents of the tower would also be able to view her and her family while they are in their yard.

A spokesperson for Ryan Companies said the company set aside 20 percent of the units for affordable housing. The company also claims the project would boost the city’s tax base.

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What is the relationship between being a historical SunDown Town (a town that set out to bar certain races from living within its city limits) and having voted for Donald Trump today?

by Kevin Stoda, born and bread in Midwest America–in & near American Sundown Towns

Some years ago, Dr. James W. Loewen, began to research the historical locations of America’s Sundown Towns. In his "SundownTowns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism,"Loewen wrote:

"From Maine to California, thousands of communities kept out African Americans (or sometimes Chinese Americans, Jewish Americans, etc.) by force, law, or custom. These communities are sometimes called ‘sundown towns’ because some of them posted signs at their city limits reading, typically, ‘n-word, Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On You In ___.’ Some towns are still all white on purpose. Their chilling stories have been joined more recently by the many elite (and some not so elite) suburbs like Grosse Pointe, MI, or Edina, MN, that have excluded nonwhites by ‘kinder gentler means.’"

Loewen continued, "When I began this research, I expected to find about 10 sundown towns in Illinois (my home state) and perhaps 50 across the country. Instead, I have found about 507 in Illinois and thousands across the United States. This is their story; it is the first book ever written on the topic."

Wikipedia: "Sundown towns, known as sunset towns or gray towns, were all-white municipalities or neighborhoods that practiced a form of segregation by enforcing restrictions excluding people of non-white races via some combination of discriminatory local laws, intimidation, and violence."[1]

Too Many Historical Sundown Towns in the USA Affect our Politics Today

Recently, I wrote a political science professor at the University of Kansas and encouraged him to do statistical analyses on whether there was a disproportionate relationship to be found amongst USA towns that voted for Donald Trump and the country’s many Sundown Towns or Sundown Counties. Like Professor Loewen, I had been raised in three Midwestern states as a child myself and have only come to retroactively (over decades) come to observe the wide spread prevalences of SunDown Towns in these states: Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas.

The first 8 years of my life, I grew up in the town of Genoa, Illinois, which is located in DeKalb County. Dekalb City, the largest town in the county, was a historical Sundown City in that same county. I believe that politically, the county of DeKalb also went to George Wallace’s presidential campaign in the 1968 election. From this point on own my father–who was born in the same county–, began to believe that (in retrospect), "Perhaps our little town of Genoa was a Sundown Town, too." I could only recall one token Mexican American family living at the edge of that town through the time we moved to Missouri in 1970.

Naturally, most of the thousands–or even hundreds of thousands–of communities in the United States that one can now label as Sundown Towns historically were often de facto Sun Down towns–rather than de jur Sundown towns.

Whether parts of towns or counties, many regions and towns across our land were simply openly redlined, such as were parts of Midwestern cities, like Chicago, Kansas City, St. Louis, Johnson County (KS).(Note: As recent as this year, 2018, "Lending discrimination, redlining still plague St. Louis, new data show". [2]

Long before open-redlining was prohibited in most communities across the land, my mother was born in and raised in the town of Sarcoxie, Missouri, which is a Sundown Town located on the southeast edge of Jasper County. No blacks apparently lived in that town at all in the 1950s or 1940s when she grew up there. My mom now lives in another town in the opposite corner of the Jasper County. It’s named Carl Junction, which is also a historical Sundown town in that Dixiecrat area of the state. Over the years, I have seen only one black family move into the area around the historic downtown of Carl Junction over the past decade.

In Missouri, I lived as a middle-schooler with my family in a multicultural town–named Wentzville and located in St. Charles County. However, throughout the state of Missouri, there were Sundown towns, such as Webb City–also in Jasper County or Warsaw, located near Lake of the Ozarks. Certainly, there is evidence to show that prior to the 1950s the now infamous Ferguson, Missouri was a Sundown Town.

I may certainly be misusing the term "Dixiecrat" here, but I am doing so here to make it clear that the separation between southern and northern Missouri had been one of two types of Democracies above and below the Mason-Dixon line . Later, Cities were divided long ago amongst racial lines, too, both in large and small cities. Neosho, the neighboring county to the south of Jasper County, was the seat of the infamous rump group of Show-Me Staters who sought to cut the state in half during the early battles between confederate and union soldiers in 1861.

Fast-forward to the red-hatted Donald Trump Election of 2016 in Jasper County. Sarcoxie township went to Trump while my mother, a Democrat of today (not a Dixiecrat cum GOP member post 1970s) was afraid to go out in either Carl Junction to poll-watch that day, i.e. this was because there were so many rumors that Trump’s red-hatted bullies would be poll-watching, too.

Trump Voters Shocked After Watching This Leaked Video

I’d like to invite other writers and researchers across the United States to investigate how the ambience or milieu or landscape of our real-existing communities in 2018 is still affected by historical racism. A tour of our local SunDown Towns should help us.

I am a lifelong educator, and we–as educators– need to make it clear to the youth of today how the world we are in actually came to be. We need to shine the light on real histories and experiences, and we need to make conscious to ALL AMERICANS the need for transformation, reform and calls to turn the country on its head.

Restoration and revitalization is needed in America and common historical understandings of our history and what differentiates Trump’s America from the rest is an important place to start this renewal.[3]

NOTES

[1] During the Reconstruction Era, many thousands of towns became sundown towns. In some cases, the exclusion was official town policy or was promulgated by the community’s real estate agents via exclusionary covenants governing who could buy or rent property. In others, the policy was enforced through intimidation. This intimidation could occur in a number of ways, including harassment by law enforcement officers. [2]

In 1844 Oregon banned African-Americans from the territory altogether. Those that failed to leave were subject to receiving lashings, under a law known as the "Peter Burnett Lash Law" named for California’s first governor, Peter Hardeman Burnett. The law was eventually repealed, with no persons ever lashed under the law. [3]

Since the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and especially since the Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited racial discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing, the number of sundown towns has decreased. However, as sociologist James W. Loewen writes in his book on the subject, Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism (2005), it is impossible to precisely count the number of sundown towns at any given time, because most towns have not kept records of the ordinances or signs that marked the town’s sundown status. He further notes that hundreds of cities across America have been sundown towns at some point in their history. [4]

Additionally, Loewen notes that sundown status meant more than just that African-Americans were unable to live in these towns. Essentially any African-Americans (or sometimes other ethnic groups) who entered or were found in sundown towns after sunset were subject to harassment, threats, and violent acts–up to and including lynching. [4]

The U.S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education ruled segregation of schools unconstitutional in 1954. Sociologist James Loewen argues that the case caused some municipalities in the South to become sundown towns. Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky saw drastic drops in African American populations living in the states following the decision. [5]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sundown_town .

[2] I n the state of Kansas alone, some 41 counties were identified as Sundown Counties to date.

I eventually graduated from high school in Sterling, Kansas. Less than 20 miles a way was the town of Nickerson. It, too, is identified as a Sundown town. I do not recall ever learning such things in our history classes and I do know that in my day, the Topeka Board of Education decision was well-known but the implication to education in Kansas and its residents was hardly ever discussed. This is another personal reason I ask Kansas researchers and educators to step up and let people know what kind of state they have been raised in. Perhaps now one can understand the success of the Koch Brothers and Bownbackistanites in Kansas over recent decades.

Towns that saw a sharp drop in the African American population between two censuses can be classified as sundown towns if the African American absence was intentional. Credible sources including tax and census records, newspaper articles, county histories, and WPA files are required to confirm a town as a sundown town.

Extensive research beyond examining U.S. Census data is required in order to document a sundown town. Researchers must determine that the absence of African Americans in a town is due to a systematic policy and not change in demographics.

Other people of color targeted

Man Who Predicted Trump’s Victory Makes A Shocking Prediction

African-Americans were not the only people of color driven out of some towns where they lived. One example, according to Loewen, is that in 1870, Chinese people made up one-third of Idaho’s population. Following a wave of violence and an 1886 anti-Chinese convention in Boise, almost none remained by 1910.In another example, the town of Gardnerville, Nevada is said to have blown a whistle at 6 p.m. daily alerting Native Americans to leave by sundown. Three additional examples of the numerous road signs documented during the first half of the 20th century include:

In Colorado: "No Mexicans After Night".In Connecticut: "Whites Only Within City Limits After Dark’.In Nevada, the ban was expanded to include Japanese.

Jews were also excluded from living in some sundown towns, such as Darien, Connecticut and Lake Forest, Illinois (which kept anti-Jewish and anti-African American housing covenants until 1990).

In Maria Marulanda’s 2010 article in the Fordham Law Review titled "Preemption, Patchwork Immigration Laws, and the Potential for Brown Sundown Towns", Marulanda outlines the possibility for non-blacks to be excluded from towns in the United States. Marulanda argued that immigration laws and ordinances in certain municipalities could create similar situations to those experienced by African Americans in sundown towns. Hispanic Americans are likely the target in these cases of racial exclusion.

from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sundown_town

See these two videos for more on Kansas City and Segregation historically:

(1) Our Divided City (PBS):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJS9aPW8kd4 .

Constant Fatigue Is A Warning Sign – See The Simple Fix

What is the relationship between being a historical SunDown Town (a town that set out to bar certain races from living within its city limits) and having voted for Donald Trump today?

by Kevin Stoda, born and bread in Midwest America–in & near American Sundown Towns

Some years ago, Dr. James W. Loewen, began to research the historical locations of America’s Sundown Towns. In his "SundownTowns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism,"Loewen wrote:

"From Maine to California, thousands of communities kept out African Americans (or sometimes Chinese Americans, Jewish Americans, etc.) by force, law, or custom. These communities are sometimes called ‘sundown towns’ because some of them posted signs at their city limits reading, typically, ‘n-word, Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On You In ___.’ Some towns are still all white on purpose. Their chilling stories have been joined more recently by the many elite (and some not so elite) suburbs like Grosse Pointe, MI, or Edina, MN, that have excluded nonwhites by ‘kinder gentler means.’"

Loewen continued, "When I began this research, I expected to find about 10 sundown towns in Illinois (my home state) and perhaps 50 across the country. Instead, I have found about 507 in Illinois and thousands across the United States. This is their story; it is the first book ever written on the topic."

Wikipedia: "Sundown towns, known as sunset towns or gray towns, were all-white municipalities or neighborhoods that practiced a form of segregation by enforcing restrictions excluding people of non-white races via some combination of discriminatory local laws, intimidation, and violence."[1]

Too Many Historical Sundown Towns in the USA Affect our Politics Today

Recently, I wrote a political science professor at the University of Kansas and encouraged him to do statistical analyses on whether there was a disproportionate relationship to be found amongst USA towns that voted for Donald Trump and the country’s many Sundown Towns or Sundown Counties. Like Professor Loewen, I had been raised in three Midwestern states as a child myself and have only come to retroactively (over decades) come to observe the wide spread prevalences of SunDown Towns in these states: Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas.

The first 8 years of my life, I grew up in the town of Genoa, Illinois, which is located in DeKalb County. Dekalb City, the largest town in the county, was a historical Sundown City in that same county. I believe that politically, the county of DeKalb also went to George Wallace’s presidential campaign in the 1968 election. From this point on own my father–who was born in the same county–, began to believe that (in retrospect), "Perhaps our little town of Genoa was a Sundown Town, too." I could only recall one token Mexican American family living at the edge of that town through the time we moved to Missouri in 1970.

Naturally, most of the thousands–or even hundreds of thousands–of communities in the United States that one can now label as Sundown Towns historically were often de facto Sun Down towns–rather than de jur Sundown towns.

Whether parts of towns or counties, many regions and towns across our land were simply openly redlined, such as were parts of Midwestern cities, like Chicago, Kansas City, St. Louis, Johnson County (KS).(Note: As recent as this year, 2018, "Lending discrimination, redlining still plague St. Louis, new data show". [2]

Long before open-redlining was prohibited in most communities across the land, my mother was born in and raised in the town of Sarcoxie, Missouri, which is a Sundown Town located on the southeast edge of Jasper County. No blacks apparently lived in that town at all in the 1950s or 1940s when she grew up there. My mom now lives in another town in the opposite corner of the Jasper County. It’s named Carl Junction, which is also a historical Sundown town in that Dixiecrat area of the state. Over the years, I have seen only one black family move into the area around the historic downtown of Carl Junction over the past decade.

In Missouri, I lived as a middle-schooler with my family in a multicultural town–named Wentzville and located in St. Charles County. However, throughout the state of Missouri, there were Sundown towns, such as Webb City–also in Jasper County or Warsaw, located near Lake of the Ozarks. Certainly, there is evidence to show that prior to the 1950s the now infamous Ferguson, Missouri was a Sundown Town.

I may certainly be misusing the term "Dixiecrat" here, but I am doing so here to make it clear that the separation between southern and northern Missouri had been one of two types of Democracies above and below the Mason-Dixon line . Later, Cities were divided long ago amongst racial lines, too, both in large and small cities. Neosho, the neighboring county to the south of Jasper County, was the seat of the infamous rump group of Show-Me Staters who sought to cut the state in half during the early battles between confederate and union soldiers in 1861.

Fast-forward to the red-hatted Donald Trump Election of 2016 in Jasper County. Sarcoxie township went to Trump while my mother, a Democrat of today (not a Dixiecrat cum GOP member post 1970s) was afraid to go out in either Carl Junction to poll-watch that day, i.e. this was because there were so many rumors that Trump’s red-hatted bullies would be poll-watching, too.

Trump Voters Shocked After Watching This Leaked Video

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EDINA, MN – Welcome to a one-of-a-kind property in Edina. This stunning, refined two-story house sits on a beautiful lot on Minnehaha Creek.

Enjoy an open and airy main level with amazing view of the creek. Beautiful Oak hardwood floors through out, four bedrooms on upper level with laundry.

The lower-level opens to a walkout with a wet bar, flex room, and an exercise room. Walk out to a large flat rear yard, heated in-ground pool on the creek.

This listing originally appeared on realtor.com. For more information and photos, click here.

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SHAKOPEE, MN — The Shakopee Public Schools community is mourning the loss of Melissa Zahn, the principal of Central Family Center. Zahn died Wednesday morning following a years-long battle with breast cancer.

In honor of her, staff in the district are wearing pink Thursday to "remember her contributions to our district, staff and students."

Zahn, of Jordan, was initially diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011 when she was 27 years old, but was declared cancer-free following a double mastectomy in 2012.

In 2014 cancer returned and was found to have spread to her liver. Despite the new diagnosis, Zahn remained dedicated to her work with children. In 2015 she was named WCCO’s "Excellent Educator" of the week.

That same year she and her husband began in vitro fertilization through a gestational carrier; their son was born in January 2016, Shakopee Valley News reported.

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As the cancer escalated, Zahn was put on medical leave from her principal position in November 2017.

"This was not our plan," read an entry on her GoFundMe page. "Although she’s been fighting for six years, this was all too sudden and we are just not ready."

"Please continue Melissa’s spirit through acts of kindness, compassion, and bringing goodness to all you meet. Melissa lives on through us and our actions. We will teach Henry what an incredible woman his mother was and how she made a difference on earth."

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EDINA, Minn. (AP) — The life of Barbara Klas seemed perfect — a 21-year marriage, two children, a posh home in Woodbury and a career as an attorney.

Then came the perfect disaster. Her husband announced he was moving to Duluth, buying a company and dating a new girlfriend "half his age," recalled Klas.

It felt like being pushed out of an airplane.

"He was going through a midlife crisis," Klas told the Pioneer Press .

But she was able to find a parachute — Daisy Camp. The Edina nonprofit group runs a series of divorce camps for women enduring one of the worst periods of their lives.

Klas has been to several of the camps, which range from two hours to two days in length. The sessions have different themes, such as child custody, finances or legal rights. But each one addresses the fundamental need for women going through divorce — dealing with their emotions.

"Divorce is 70 percent emotional, 30 percent legal," said Angela Heart, divorce attorney and a presenter at a Daisy Camp in January.

There is a long list of legal concerns for any divorced woman to navigate, she told the group. But those are all secondary.

"The No. 1 thing you need to do," Heart said, "is take care of yourself."

Daisy Camp was formed in 2006 by Jennifer Morris, 48, of Excelsior, who was going through a divorce of her own.

She found herself conducting an autopsy on her marriage, dealing with all the separate pieces — children, money, the house, cars and divorce law. She felt powerless, foolish, depressed.

She designed Daisy Camp to be what she never had — an affordable one-stop shop for women facing divorce. For a low cost, it serves as an ongoing divorce academy and support group for women — whether they or their spouse initiated the divorce.

"They support one another, educate themselves and make wise choices," said Morris. "We aren’t sitting in a circle singing ‘Kumbaya.’"

The cost is $25 for the two-hour evening meetings, and $60 for all-day sessions. Scholarships are available for those who can’t afford the fees.

"We don’t turn anyone away," said Morris.

Nancy Pierson, 57, of Oakdale, was introduced to Daisy Camp in 2009.

That’s when she happened to glance at her husband’s computer screen — and instantly knew her marriage was over. Staring back at her was a series of messages from his new girlfriend.

"I was blown away. I was scared. It still makes me emotional," she said, her voice cracking.

At her first Daisy Camp session, she found the information and camaraderie she needed.

At that meeting, another woman discreetly slipped her some cash.

"It was so shocking to me, a total stranger doing that," said Pierson. "She said to me, ‘I know where you are at.’ So sweet, so sweet."

Jessica Benson, 37, felt besieged when living in Lino Lakes in 2011. She was going through the death of her sister, and was adopting her niece in a bitter legal battle. On top of it all, her husband began to drift away from her.

"When things got tough, it was too much for him," she said. "I was terrified. I had no job, no income. Part of me felt like a failure. I could not make this work."

Daisy Camp awarded her a scholarship.

"That was super-huge for me," said Benson. "Daisy Camp is the best thing I ever did."

At a meeting Jan. 24 in Woodbury, divorced mom Klas wore a "Warrior" T-shirt as she took a seat at a table laden with Kleenex and cookies.

Attorney Heart patiently explained the legal aspects of divorce — the deadlines, the options, the obligations. She acknowledged their ongoing pain and confusion.

"You might look at this as negative and terrible," Heart told them, "but we are here to reframe it."

Attorney Klas said advice from lawyers was a lifesaver for her. She said that often women are so emotionally paralyzed that they can’t think clearly.

"They sometimes don’t even appreciate the need to get a lawyer," said Klas. "When women are stunned, their spouses can sometimes get them to sign their rights away, just to be done with it. Women need to know their rights. You are responsible for finding your own joy."

As she walked out at the end of the meeting, Klas grabbed Daisy Camp founder Morris by the arm.

"I just want to tell you," said Klas, "there is a huge amount that you have done for me."

———

Information from: St. Paul Pioneer Press, http://www.twincities.com

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3505 W 55th St, Edina, MN 55410
3505 W 55th St, Edina, MN 55410

3505 W 55th St, Edina, MN 55410 is a single family home for sale, and has been listed on the market for 1 day. 3505 W 55th St is in the Creek Knoll neighborhood, which has a median listing price of $799,900. The median listing price for Creek Knoll is 90% greater than Edina at $550,000, and 452% greater than MN at $189,900. Nearby neighborhoods like have a median listing price of $1,050,000. The schools near 3505 W 55th St include Concord Elementary School, South View Middle School, and Edina Senior High School, which are all in the School District: Edina. There are similar and nearby single family homes for sale include 4717 Drew Ave S, 5353 Drew Ave S, and 5828 York Ave S.

‘Basic Listing Information: 3505 W 55th St is more than just a Edina, MN address. It is a home with 6 beds, 4 baths, and 4,030 square feet. At $$799,900 it is a Edina property for sale.’

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Is 3505 W 55th St the right property for you? It might be, but if it’s not, let realtor.com® help you find the one that is. With experienced REALTORS®, great property listings that cover everything from square footage to local schools information, you’re likely to find the property that you’re looking for fast and without a hassle.

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